From CASE Reports, Volume 14,1 (February 1999)

New Members Elected to CASE in 1998


Yung-chi Cheng

Henry Bronson Professor of Pharmacology, Yale University School of Medicine, and Director, Development Therapeutics Program, Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center. Professor Cheng is a member of numerous societies and associations, including the American Association for Cancer Research, the American Microbiology Society, the American Society of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, and Sigma Xi. He served from 1991–1994 on the NIH AIDS Research Advisory Committee, and from 1989–1993 on the board of directors of the American Association for Cancer Research. He received the Rhoads Memorial Award from the American Association for Cancer Research in 1981, and an Outstanding Investigator Award from the National Cancer Institute for each of the past ten years. He was elected a member of the Academia Sinica, Republic of China, and serves as a consultant for the governments of the United States, China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. He was elected to CASE on the basis of his discovery of several new anti-cancer and anti-viral compounds; four of these compounds are currently in clinical trials for the treatment of cancer and viral diseases.


Niloy K. Dutta

Professor of Physics, University of Connecticut. Professor Dutta is formerly the Head of Optoelectronic Device Research at Bell Laboratories in New Jersey. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE), the Optical Society of America, and the International Society of Optical Engineers. He is the recipient of the Distinguished Lecturer Award from the Lasers and Electro-Optics Society (LEOS) in 1995. He currently serves as Associate Editor of IEEE’s Journal of Quantum Electronics, and chairs the Connecticut chapter of LEOS. Professor Dutta was elected to CASE on the basis of his contributions to the understanding of long-wavelength semiconductor lasers, and applications of these devices to lightwave transmission systems.


Amir Faghri

Dean, School of Engineering and Professor of Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut. Professor Faghri is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineering, an associate fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and a member of the American Society of Engineering Education. He is currently the North American editor for the Journal of Enhanced Heat Transfer and executive editor of the Heat Transfer Engineering Journal. He was elected to CASE on the basis of his research in the fields of convection heat transfer and heat pipes. This research, which has applications to satellite design, aerospace engine design and other areas in the chemical processing industry, has resulted in a generalized solution to the energy equations for solid and liquid flow that include phase change, compressibility, rarefied flow, porous medium, conjugated effects, evaporation and condensation.


Thomas E. Graedel

Professor of Industrial Ecology, Chemical Engineering, and Geophysics, Yale University School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. Professor Graedel currently heads the Atmospheric Sciences Section of the American Geophysical Union, of which he is a fellow; he is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the American Chemistry Society, the Electrochemical Society, and the American Meteorological Society. He worked for AT&T Bell Laboratories for 27 years before coming to Yale. He has received numerous honors and awards, and is the author/coauthor of nine books. He was elected to CASE on the basis of his contributions to the fields of atmospheric chemistry and global change, as well as his current work in pioneering new methods for assessing the environmental impacts of industrial products, processes and facilities.


Facquir Jain

Professor of Electrical and Systems Engineering and Director, Microelec-tronics/Optoelectronics Laboratory, University of Connecticut. Professor Jain is a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, the American Physical Society, the Optical Society of America, and Sigma Xi. He is a proponent of industry-university cooperative research, and is one of the co-founders of the Connecticut Microelectronics and Optoelectronics Consortium (CMOC). He was elected to CASE on the basis of his pioneering contributions to semiconductor devices, processes and applications, and for his leadership role in the formation and operation of CMOC. Professor Jain’s current research interests include design and fabrication of quantum well/wire/dot lasers, modulators and filters for smart projection color displays, optically controlled phased array radars, and optical computing. He is also involved in the design and implementation of nanophosphor-based displays, nano-transistors, and quantum interference devices for terahertz operation.


David A. Kessler

Dean, Yale University School of Medicine and Professor of Pediatrics and Professor of Public Health. Dean Kessler is the former commissioner of the United States Food and Drug Administration. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine, Phi Beta Kappa, and Sigma Xi, and is the recipient of numerous professional honors and awards, including the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Leadership Award from the March of Dimes, the Woodrow Wilson Award for Distinguished Government Service Award from Johns Hopkins University, and the American Cancer Society’s Medal of Honor. He co-chaired the federal Advisory Committee on Tobacco and Public Health, and has served on advisory committees on health care technology, drug development and regulation, food safety, and AIDS drug development. He also participated in the Institute of Medicine roundtable on AIDS and the National Academy of Sciences’ roundtable on Government-University-Industry. He is the recipient of numerous public and community service awards, including the Public Service Achievement Award from Common Cause and the Excellence in Public Health Award from the American Academy of Pediatrics. Dean Kessler was elected to CASE on the basis of his outstanding leadership in the fields of public health and food safety.


Michael H. Merson

Dean of Public Health and Professor and Chairman, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine; Director, Yale University Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS (CIRA). Dean Merson is a member of the American Epidemiology Society, the International AIDS Society, the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, and the International Epidemiological Association. He has served on the editorial board of the AIDS Journal, and is currently a member of the advisory editorial board of AIDS: Research, Theory and Practice, International Encyclopedia of Psychiatry, Psychology, Psychoanalysis and Neurology. He serves on the United States Association for United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, and the Connecticut Alcohol and Drug Policy Council, and chairs the State Task Force on HIV Reporting. Dean Merson received the US Public Health Service’s Commendation Medal twice, the Surgeon General’s Exemplary Service Medal, and the Connecticut Health Commissioner’s AIDS Leadership Award. He was executive director the World Health Organization’s Global Programme on AIDS from 1993–1995. He was elected to CASE on the basis of his international leadership in the fight against two major disease groups: cholera and other diarrhoeal disease, and HIV/AIDS.


Peter Bartlett Moore

Eugene Higgins Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Yale University. Professor Moore is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the New York Academy of Sciences, the Biophysical Society, the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, the American Chemical Society, and the RNA Society. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma Xi. He was a Guggenheim Fellow at the University of Oxford, and is currently editor of the Biophysical Journal of the Biophysical Society and a member of the editorial board of Structure. Professor Moore was elected to CASE on the basis of his contributions to the field of biophysical chemistry. His research interests include the structure and function of macromolecular assemblies, RNA structure and function, ribosomes, NMR spectroscopy, x-ray and neutron scattering and crystallography.


Kenneth M. Rosen

Vice President, Development Engineering and Advanced Programs, Sikorsky Aircraft. Dr. Rosen is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society and the Society of Automotive Engineers. He is an associate fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and is a member of American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Army Aviation Association, the Navy League, and Pi Tau Sigma. He is the recipient of the Dr. Klemin Award from the American Helicopter Society. Dr. Rosen is chairman of the board of the Rotorcraft Industry Technology Association, vice president of the American Helicopter Society, and chairman of United Technologies Engineering Coordination Activities. Dr. Rosen was elected to CASE on the basis of his key role in rotorcraft technology and his direction of programs such as Comanche, S-92, Cypher UAV, Black Hawk, and X-Wing.


Robert V. Smith

Vice Provost for Research and Graduate Education and Dean of the Graduate School, University of Connecticut. Dean Smith is a fellow of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists and the Academy of Pharmaceutical Sciences. He is a member of the Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences and Sigma Xi. Dean Smith has served on numerous boards and committees, including the board of directors of the Council of Graduate Schools; he is currently a member of the National Extended Graduate Education Task Force of the Council of Graduate Schools and the Executive Committee of Graduate Deans. He was elected to CASE on the basis of his work in the field of pharmaceutical chemistry and research administration; his pioneering work in graduate research in universities has redefined the utility and process of research in graduate education.


Dieter Gerhard Söll

Professor of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Yale University. Professor Söll is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and was a Guggenheim Fellow in both 1972 and 1989. He was the recipient of the Humboldt Preis (Senior Distinguished Scientist Award) in 1988. Professor Söll was elected to CASE on the basis of his contributions to the understanding of diverse cellular roles of transfer RNAs in biology, their biosynthesis, and their molecular recognition. He discovered tRNA-dependent glutamine and asparagine formation, and established a novel role for tRNA in porphyrin biosynthesis. Professor Söll’s research interests are in the area of molecular biology of protein biosynthesis.


John C. Tully

Arthur T. Kemp Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Physics and Applied Physics, Yale University. Professor Tully is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Chemical Society, and Sigma Xi. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Physical Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He received the American Chemical Society’s Peter Debye Award in Physical Chemistry in 1995, and recently served on the advisory board of the Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics of the Harvard Smithsonian. He serves on the editorial boards of Accounts of Chemical Research, Chemical Physics, Theoretical Chemistry Accounts, and Surface Science, and currently chairs the advisory board of the Materials Center of the University of Chicago. Professor Tully was elected to CASE on the basis of his contributions to the field of chemical dynamics and theoretical chemistry.


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